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The OpenScientoMeter: A serious game to engage with the diversity of open science practices and topics

The scope of open science and the diversity of topics and practices that it entails can be overwhelming. The OpenScientoMeter is a serious game that is designed to help researchers better understand and navigate this diversity.

Published onApr 26, 2023
The OpenScientoMeter: A serious game to engage with the diversity of open science practices and topics
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Abstract

The scope of open science and the diversity of topics and practices that it entails can be challenging and overwhelming, especially for early career researchers or other stakeholders that are not well-versed in open science. The OpenScientoMeter is a serious game that is designed to present an overview of this diversity and to help researchers and other stakeholders better navigate and understand the various themes, practices, and issues underlying open science. This poster presents how this game works and explains how its logic and mechanisms help articulate these objectives.

Practically speaking, the game includes five challenges, each of which simultaneously presents players with four different prompts that can address open science tools, resources, or topics in the form of questions. The answers to these questions will always be a numerical value (a date, a proportion, a number, etc.). Players are required to examine these prompts and find the ones whose answers correspond to the highest and lowest values of a challenge.

The educational advantages of this gameplay and its mechanisms are numerous. First, it introduces a variety of open science ideas, tools, and resources at a glance to the participants (e.g. the DOAJ, Article Processing Charges, the FAIR principles, DORA, or preprints). If necessary, all prompts contain contextual information describing the issue or resource under review. Second, it promotes active learning by requiring players to critically compare and evaluate practices and tools or how they are implemented (e.g. author fee-based open access publishing, data repositories, creative commons licenses, linguistic diversity among OA journals). Moreover, comparing the realities behind particular numbers, such as the proportion of author fee-based vs. non author fee-based OA journals, can help debunk common myths or help participants to reconsider some of their preconceived notions regarding specific aspects of open science. Finally, the OpenScientoMeter can be played in a solo or collaborative mode, the latter of which encourages participants to exchange ideas and best practices.

Poster

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Author biography

Christophe Dony (University of Liège) works as a research and subject librarian at the University of Liège, where he is involved in a variety of open science projects and initiatives. His main research interests include the intertwining of open science, bibliodiversity, multilingualism, and research evaluation. He has notably translated the 20th Anniversary Recommendations of the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI20) into French and co-created Compass to Publish, a free online tool to help researchers identify possible predatory journals. Before joining the University of Liège Library, he completed a PhD in comics studies. Every now and then, he uses comics as scholarship to discuss some of his research interests revolving around open science and scholarly communications.

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